Sharing The Road With Motorcyclists
Aug 19th, 2017 | CAKNOW Tech
According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 4,976 motorcyclists were killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2015, an 8% increase from 2014. In the first nine months of 2016, the National Safety Council announced that 2016 may have been the deadliest year on the roads since 2007. As the driver of an automobile, it is your responsibility to take caution and do everything in you power to prevent collisions and accidents with motorcyclists.


Due to increasing gas prices, in recent years, there has been a notable increase in the number of motorcycles on the road. In an effort to decrease their fuel consumption, many drivers have traded in their cars for super efficient motorcycles. This movement has led to a huge number of inexperienced riders on the road. Keep in mind there is no such thing as a “fender bender” for a motorcycle rider. Motorcycles are often smaller and harder to see – plus they don’t have the safeguards of metal framing, seat belts, and airbags when it comes to protection from collision. Because they are totally exposed, most multi-vehicle accidents involving motorcycles cause serious or fatal injuries to riders. It is now more important now than ever for vehicle drivers to make proper sharing of the road with motorcyclists a huge priority and responsibility.


Signaling and checking mirrors and blind spots when switching lanes are legally required in California to begin with, but with harder to see motorcycles, who may not been seen from a casual glance, it becomes a matter of life and death. Especially in low light or bad weather. Larger vehicles, such as trucks and vans, have an even more limited vision due to larger blind spots than other vehicles. When making turns, especially left-turns, it is a good idea to look a second time for motorcyclists and gauge their speed before turning. Left-turn collisions are often the most severe for riders because they usually result in the motorcycle t-boning the car mid– turn. When it comes to motorcycle turn signals, allow the rider extra time to see what they do. Unlike cars, most motorcycle signals are not self-canceling and the rider could possibly have forgotten to switch them off.


Signaling and checking mirrors and blind spots when switching lanes are legally required in California to begin with, but with harder to see motorcycles, who may not been seen from a casual glance, it becomes a matter of life and death. Especially in low light or bad weather. Larger vehicles, such as trucks and vans, have an even more limited vision due to larger blind spots than other vehicles. When making turns, especially left-turns, it is a good idea to look a second time for motorcyclists and gauge their speed before turning. Left-turn collisions are often the most severe for riders because they usually result in the motorcycle t-boning the car mid– turn. When it comes to motorcycle turn signals, allow the rider extra time to see what they do. Unlike cars, most motorcycle signals are not self-canceling and the rider could possibly have forgotten to switch them off.


Drivers often assume that because motorcycles are considerably smaller than vehicles it is safe to share the lane with them. Think again. Although it is not illegal to share the lane with motorcycles, it is unsafe. Give the biker the full lane just as you would with any other vehicle or driver. Never try to pass a motorcycle in the same lane you are sharing and refrain from passing motorcyclists at night and in bad weather. Drivers who cut off or unintentionally pull in front of a motorcycle without allowing enough space can force the rider to over brake, slide, and fall. Because motorcycles generally stop faster than passenger vehicles, it is essential to allow a four second following distance. You will need this space to avoid hitting a rider if they brake suddenly or fall off their bike.


Drivers who become hyper vigilant about sharing the roads safely and respectfully have the greatest potential to reduce multi– vehicle crashes involving motorcycles, rider injuries, and fatalities. Taking the extra time to be more aware, patient, and cautious of the motorcyclists you share the road with increases the safety of the roads for us all.


Resources:
https://www.directgeneral.com/learning-center/safe-driving-tips/share-road-with-motorcycles
http://driving-tests.org/beginner-drivers/how-to-share-the-road-with-motorcycles-10-things-every-driver-should-know/ https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/?1dmy&urile=wcm:path:/dmv_content_en/dmv/pubs/hdbk/shr_slow_veh https://crashstats.nhtsa.dot.gov/Api/Public/ViewPublication/812353 http://www.nsc.org/NSCDocuments_Advocacy/State-of-Safety/State-Report.pdf


Automotive Service
At Your Fingertips
The Ultimate Summer Road Trip Playlist
Aug 10th | 2017 by CAKNOW Tech
Late summer is road trip season for many across the country. While most everyone has their own playlist for the car …
LEARN MORE >
The Pros & Cons Of Waterless Car Washes
Jul 26th | 2017 by CAKNOW Tech
According to the U.S. Drought Calculator, only 1.06% of California still remains in a stage D2 severe drought compared to 57.79% this time just last year …
LEARN MORE >
Things To Do Immediately After A Car Accident!
Jul 13th | 2017 by CAKNOW Tech
How many times do we hear about car accidents and their horrible consequences in our daily news? An accident can occur in less than one second; …
LEARN MORE >